News + Media

In the News

July 11, 2022

Ukraine war: Is Russian defeat nothing but a 'fantasy'?

Barry R PosenDW News

Barry R Posen, Ford International Professor of Political Science at MIT, speaks on DW News about the Ukraine war and his analysis of possible outcomes. 

In the News

July 10, 2022

What the world can learn from South Africa

David GoodmanVTDigger

“At this time when the idea of democracy is under assault, South Africa shows us that (democracy) is still a really promising and probably our best political solution, particularly in diverse societies,” says Evan Lieberman in a recent interview. Lieberman offers a fresh take on South Africa’s journey to democracy in his new book, "Until we have won liberty: South Africa after apartheid."

PM Shinzo Abe during a 2015 visit to MIT

Analysis + Opinion

July 8, 2022

CIS mourns the loss of Shinzo Abe, former prime minister of Japan

Richard SamuelsCenter for International Studies

It is with tremendous sadness and alarm that a senseless act of political violence claimed the life of former prime minister Shinzo Abe on July 8 while he was speaking at a political campaign event for the Liberal Democratic Party in the city of Nara in western Japan. We join the Japanese people in mourning their loss, and send our condolences to the Abe family.

Ukrainian President Vladimir Zelensky in Kyiv, July 2022 Ukrainian Presidential Press Service / Reuters

Analysis + Opinion

July 8, 2022

Ukraine’s implausible theories of victory

Barry PosenForeign Affairs

The Ukrainian and Western theories of victory have been built on weak reasoning. At best, they are a costly avenue to a painful stalemate that leaves much Ukrainian territory in Russian hands. If this is the best that can be hoped for after additional months or years of fighting, then there is only one responsible thing to do: seek a diplomatic end to the war now.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

In the News

July 8, 2022

Shinzo Abe’s influence was still evident long after he left office

David E SangerThe New York Times

Quoted: “We didn’t know what we were going to get when Abe came to office with this hard nationalist reputation,” said Richard Samuels, the director of the Center for International Studies at MIT and the author of books on Japan’s military and intelligence capabilities. “What we got was a pragmatic realist who understood the limits of Japan’s power, and who knew it wasn’t going to be able to balance China’s rise on its own. So he designed a new system.”

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

In the News

July 8, 2022

Why Shinzo Abe was such a towering figure in Japan

Tobias BurnsThe Hill

Quoted: Abe “sought to shift the center of gravity in Japanese political culture away from the pacifism that characterized most of the early to mid post-war period to a place that was, in his view, more normal,” Richard Samuels, a political scientist and Japanologist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said in an interview, speaking from Berlin.

US President Joe Biden boards Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on May 13. STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES

Analysis + Opinion

July 7, 2022

What to expect from Biden’s big Middle East trip

Steven Simon and Aaron David MillerForeign Policy

With rare exception, the Middle East has become a place where US presidential ideas, especially big ones, go to die. Wisely recognizing this cruel reality, US President Joe Biden’s administration tried to steer clear of the region through much of the past year and a half.

Steve Simon

précis

June 29, 2022

précis Interview: Steven Simon

Steven Simon joined CIS in 2021 as its Robert E Wilhelm Fellow. He served as the National Security Council senior director for the Middle East and North Africa during the Obama Administration and as the council's senior director for counterterrorism in the Clinton White House. He sat down with précis to discuss his research at MIT, assess our nation’s security challenges, and offer advice to students pursuing careers in national security.

Nina Miller

précis

June 29, 2022

Blame games: Malattribution and the Madrid train bombings

After an act of political violence, the first question most people ask is who is responsible. Blame can be a powerful political force that spurs anger and mobilizes people. When leaders shape the public narrative about blame, it can allow them to deflect criticism and pursue policy goals, explains Nina Miller, a PhD student in security studies and international relations in the Department of Political Science.

A gravedigger working at a site where 30 unidentified bodies were buried last week in Bilohorodka, near Kyiv.Credit...Mauricio Lima for The New York Times

Analysis + Opinion

June 29, 2022

The UN has documented at least 3,924 Ukrainian civilian deaths in the war.

Maham JavaidNew York Times

After visiting numerous bombing sites and detention centers, conducting hundreds of interviews and scouring piles of documents, the United Nations has put a number to the human cost of Russia’s war in Ukraine: at least 3,924 civilians dead as of May 15, of whom 193 were children, and 4,444 injured.

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