News + Media

News Release

May 1, 2006

Ambassador Francis Deng, Sudan expert, joins the MIT Center for International Studies

Francis Mading Deng, Research Professor of International Politics, Law and Society and Director of the Center for Displacement Studies at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C., joined CIS as the Center's second Robert E. Wilhelm Fellow.

News Release

May 1, 2006

Ambassador Bodine joins MIT's Center for International Studies

Barbara Bodine, a former career diplomat who served in 2003 as coordinator for post-conflict reconstruction for Baghdad and the central governorates of Iraq, and from 1997-2001 as U.S. Ambassador to Yemen, joins MIT's Center for International Studies (CIS) as a Visiting Fellow on May 1, 2006.

News Release

April 10, 2006

Former Sri Lankan Prime Minister, Ranil Wickremesinghe, visits MIT's Center for International Studies

Ranil Wickremesinghe, a lawyer who was Sri Lanka's Prime Minister from 1993-1994 and 2001-2004, has begun a several-week residency at CIS. Mr. Wickremesinghe, who will have an office at CIS until early May, will likely meet with MIT students about the resolution of civil conflicts, a subject with additional saliency given the ongoing strife in Iraq.

Audit

April 1, 2006

A double standard on nuclear weapons?

Hugh Gusterson, MIT

There has long been a widespread perception among U.S. defense intellectuals, politicians and pundits that, while we can live with the nuclear weapons of the five official nuclear nations for the indefinite future, the proliferation of nuclear weapons to nuclear-threshold states in the Third World, especially the Islamic world, would be enormously dangerous. This orthodoxy is so much a part of our collective common sense that, like all common sense, it can usually be stated as simple fact without fear of contradiction.

Audit

April 1, 2006

Human bombs: rethinking religion and terror

Nichole Argo, MIT

Suicide terror has become a daily news staple. Who are these human bombs, and why are they willing to die in order to kill? Many observers turn to Islam for an explanation. They cite the preponderance of Muslim bombers today, indoctrination by extremist institutions, and the language used in jihadi statements.

Audit

April 1, 2006

The War on Terror and the Cold War: they're not the same

John Tirman, MIT

Since the autumn of 2001, following the shocking attacks of September 11th, President Bush and his advisers have repeatedly likened the war against terrorism to the confrontation with Nazi Germany in the Second World War and the long struggle with Soviet communism in the Cold War. But the current anti-terrorist campaign and the related war in Iraq are significantly different from those earlier contests.

Analysis + Opinion

March 23, 2006

A floundering WTO

Balakrishnan RajagopalYaleglobalonline, reprinted in The Daily Times (Pakistan), The Hindu, Khaleej Times and Asian Age

Disunity in the ranks of the developing nations allows developed countries to maintain their trade barriers.

Analysis + Opinion

March 21, 2006

Weighing the cost of today's defense strategy

Cindy WilliamsBoston Globe

The House of Representatives last week voted to add $68 billion to Defense Department coffers to help defray this year's costs of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Together with the $536 billion in outlays already planned for national defense, the emergency appropriation will bring total defense spending this year to some $600 billion. Adjusting for inflation, that is substantially more than the United States spent on defense in any year since World War II.

Analysis + Opinion

March 7, 2006

Diversifying Iraqi security forces

Roger Petersen and Paul StanilandChristian Science Monitor

For a stable Iraq, Sunnis, Shiites, and Kurds must share the security burden.

Audit

March 1, 2006

We can live with a nuclear Iran

Barry R. Posen, MIT

The intense concern about Iran's nuclear energy program reflects the judgment that, should it turn to the production of weapons, an Iran with nuclear arms would gravely endanger the United States and the world. Indeed, while it's seldom a positive thing when a new nuclear power emerges, there is reason to believe that we could readily manage a nuclear Iran.

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