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News@E40

April 1, 2010

SSP summer courses, sign-up now

The Center's Security Studies Program is offering two courses during the 2010 summer session for professional studies. From Technology to Innovation: Putting Ideas to Work, offered July 12-15, explores innovations in both public and private organizations, and identifies best practices. Pandemics and Bioterrorism: From Realistic Threats to Effective Policies, offered July 26-28, looks at the challenges public health, law enforcement, and national security agencies face in ensuring biosecurity.

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March 8, 2010

Grants for research in Brazil

The MIT-Brazil Program welcomes applications from any discipline for travel grants to Brazil. These grants are open to all advanced graduate students who are working on their dissertations, especially students who have not had many opportunities to conduct research in Brazil. Applications should be submitted by March 29, 2010. More Information

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February 24, 2010

Williams addresses Senate Budget Committee

On February 23, Cindy Williams testified before the Senate Budget Committee at a hearing, "Defense Budget and War Costs: An Independent Outlook." In her written statement, she points out that contrary to conventional wisdom, past increases in defense spending do not necessarily augur future growth. Williams was joined at the witness table by Lieutenant General Paul K. Van Riper, (USMC, Ret.) and by Gordon Adams. Williams and Adams co-authored the book Buying National Security: How America Plans and Pays for Its Global Role and Safety at Home, published last month by Routledge.

News@E40

February 9, 2010

Kaysen, 89, MIT Professor Emeritus

Carl Kaysen, MIT’s David W. Skinner Professor of Political Economy (Emeritus) and beloved member of the Center's Security Studies Program, passed away on February 8. His contributions to intellectual life were immense, as was his influence on national policy. A national security expert, Kaysen had an illustrious career: he was professor of economics at Harvard University, deputy special assistant for National Security Affairs to President John F. Kennedy, director of the Institute of Advanced Study at Princeton, vice chairman and director of research for the Sloan commission on higher education, and director of MIT’s Program in Science, Technology, and Society. He also chaired the Committee on International Security Studies of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. News Story

News@E40

February 1, 2010

CIS summer study grant

Doctoral students in international affairs may receive up to $3000 in summer support for dissertation research on a broad range of global issues. Grants may be requested either for fieldwork and/or archival research, or for home-based research and write-up. The main criteria for determining awards will be the importance of the research question and the quality of the research proposal; and the strength of the letter of support. The deadline for applications is Monday, March 1, 2010. More Information

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February 1, 2010

Gercik wins award

Patricia Gercik, associate director of the MIT International Science and Technology Initiatives (MISTI) and managing director of the MIT-Japan Program, has received an MIT Excellence Award in the category of “Bringing Out the Best: Everyday Leadership throughout MIT.” Gercik joined MIT more than 25 years ago to help develop what was then a fledgling program in Japanese studies at MIT. That program—now known as MIT-Japan—marks the genesis of applied international studies at MIT and is a cornerstone of the ten (and counting) country programs of MISTI. Press Release

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January 1, 2010

Williams on 'Buying National Security'

Cindy Williams, a principal research scientist in the Security Studies Program at CIS, and Gordon Adams, a fellow at The Henry L. Stimson Center, recently co-authored a book about national security budgets, de-mystifying the institutions, organizations, processes and politics that support planning and resource allocation. In Buying National Security, the authors uniquely examine how America plans and pays for its global role and safety at home.

News@E40

January 1, 2010

IAP 2010 offerings

The Center is pleased to sponsor a variety of Independent Activities Period (IAP) courses in January 2010. This year's Security Studies Program military fellows will each teach their own course in the series "Contemporary Military Topics." Lt Col. John Walker USMC will teach “Seabasing: Amphibious and Prepositioning Ship Requirements," LTC Kurt Kunzelman USAF will teach "GPS: Changing the Engine Seamlessly, in Mid-Flight, for Over 1 Billion Users," and Colonel William "Butch" Graham USA will teach "The Counter IED Fight in Iraq: Action, Reaction, Counteraction." Also in the mix: “Beginning Kyudo Instruction: First Shot,” and “Ikebana: The Art of Japanese Flower Arranging” sponsored by MIT Japan Program; “Introduction to Chinese Calligraphy” sponsored by MIT China Program; “Flamenco Fun!” sponsored by MIT Spain Program. See more IAP listings here.

News@E40

December 10, 2009

Fellowship for undergraduates

Friday, January 8, 2010, is the application deadline for the CIS-administered research fellows program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Applicants must be graduating seniors or have graduated within the past year, and must not have started graduate school. Successful applicants are matched with a senior associate—academics, former government officials, lawyers and journalists from around the world—to work on a variety of global issues. Fellowships begin August 1, 2010. More information »

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December 2, 2009

Web site seeks visions for Jerusalem

Protests, anger, controversy, arrests, evacuation—words used in the news to describe Jerusalem today. Still, the Center's Jerusalem 2050 Program seeks visions for a city of peace by mid-century—now through a web site: www.envisioningpeace.org. The site is loaded with interactive tools and resources to help foster dialogue, ideas, and solutions for cities of conflict, beginning with Jerusalem. Envisioningpeace.org is the next phase in the Program’s efforts to organize a global problem-solving exercise. News Release

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November 23, 2009

Cold War Cinema series

The Center is delighted to introduce a Cold War Cinema series exploring the impact of this era on cinema. The first feature, presented on December 2, is Billy Wilder's 1961 film One, Two, Three. Discussing the film is journalist Christian Caryl, who was in Berlin covering the fall of the wall in 1989. Caryl is currently with Foreign Policy and Newsweek. He is also a senior fellow at CIS. Event Details

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November 23, 2009

Immigration, Islam, and the west

Christopher Caldwell comes to MIT on November 30 to discuss his latest book: Reflections on the Revolution in Europe: Immigration, Islam, and the West. "In Europe, the author argues, the clash between Western civilization and the Muslim world has already been lost—in the latter's favor." Caldwell is a senior editor at The Weekly Standard and a regular contributor to the Financial Times and Slate. His essays and reviews appear in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. Event Details

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November 18, 2009

Tirman on women & migration

A new volume drawing from a major CIS project has just been released by Springer. Women, Migration and Conflict: Breaking a Deadly Cycle, resulted from a research effort commissioned by the UN Population Fund in 2007 and managed by CIS. The project brought together leading analysts on this timely topic—mainly, how to mitigate the impacts of forced migration on women and children—in two workshops, and this book is the major product. Co-edited by Susan Forbes Martin of Georgetown University and CIS executive director John Tirman,the contributors include Dr. Jennifer Leaning of Harvard, a member of the Inter-University Committee on International Migration, which also helped advise the project. “This work shows the vital link between migration and security, and the role that multilateral organizations play in helping women deal with often dangerous, chronic dislocations,” Tirman says. “We’re pleased that we could productively work with a major U.N. agency and this excellent cohort of scholar/practitioners to produce such a useful work.”

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November 5, 2009

Oye moderates 'Census & Race' talk

A talk entitled Race, Ethnicity and the 2010 Census: Categorizing and Counting will take place on Saturday, November 7. Paul Watanabe, director of the Institute for Asian American Studies and associate professor of political science at UMass Boston, is the featured speaker. Melissa Nobles, associate professor of political science at MIT, will commentate; and Kenneth Oye, associate professor of political science and engineering systems at MIT, will moderate.

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November 2, 2009

CIS Advisory Board led by Admiral Fallon

Fallon, the group includes Mary Boies, an attorney and high-level government adviser; Jon Borschow, a businessman based in Puerto Rico and an MIT alumnus; Susan Chira, foreign editor of the New York Times; Chas W. Freeman, Jr., former US ambassador to Saudi Arabia; M. Shafik Gabr, a Cairo-based head of a major investment group; Alexis F. Habib, managing director of Spinnaker Capital Limited, London; Dana Mead, Chairman of the MIT Corporation; Yukio Okamoto, former adviser to the Japanese government; Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Managing Director of the World Bank who earned her PhD at MIT; John Reed, retired Chairman of Citigroup, and an MIT alumnus; Siddharth C.R. Shriram, an industrialist based in New Delhi; Jeffrey L. Silverman, a graduate of the Sloan School at MIT and a commodities trader in Chicago; Anthony Sun, a high-tech entrepreneur in Silicon Valley who earned degrees in engineering at MIT; Lynn Chatman Todman, director of the Institute on Social Exclusion in Chicago, and a MIT PhD in urban planning; and Thomas Wolf, a political science PhD from MIT and a Pennsylvania businessman who has served in the governor’s cabinet.

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October 29, 2009

New research on women and security

The Center is undertaking a year-long assessment of the UN’s mandate on women and security—namely, UN Security Council Resolution 1325, which obligates member states to include women in peace processes and peace building. A distinguished group of researchers from around the world will conduct case studies in Sri Lanka, Uganda, Aceh, Liberia, and Israel/Palestine to evaluate 1325’s impact on participation. Working with several key agencies in the UN system, the team will present their findings at the UN’s 10th anniversary observance of the resolution’s passage next year. John Tirman, CIS executive director and principal research scientist, and Sanam Anderlini, CIS research affiliate and director of the International Civil Society Action Network, are co-directing the project. The work is partially supported by the governments of Norway and Ireland.

News@E40

October 23, 2009

Tellis on the Taliban

Ashley Tellis delivers a talk entitled Reconciling with the Taliban? Toward an Alternative Grand Strategy in Afghanistan for the Brown-Harvard-MIT Joint Seminar on South Asia. Tellis served as advisor to Ambassador Blackwill in Delhi and is currently a fellow at the Carnegie Endowment of International Peace. The talk will be at CIS (E40-496) on Thursday, November 5.

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October 23, 2009

Obama & the Arab-Israeli conflict

Khalil Shikaki and Shai Feldman give an Israeli and Palestinian perspective on current state of affairs on Thursday, October 29. Shikaki has directed the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research in Ramallah since 2000, and has conducted more than one hundred polls among Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip since 1993. Feldman served as head of the Jaffee Center for Strategic Studies at Tel Aviv University from 1997-2005 and is the author and co-author of numerous publications, including: Bridging the Gap: A Future Security Architecture for the Middle East and Track-II Diplomacy: Lessons from the Middle East.

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October 2, 2009

MIT announces global strategy

MIT's Global Council, co-chaired by CIS director and Ford International Professor of Political Science Richard Samuels, released two reports that will help frame MIT's international engagement strategy for years to come. "Our students' hopes for productive, sustainable careers increasingly depend on acquiring stronger, deeper, and more refined international skills and understanding. Society's best hope for scientific advance depends on our ability both to draw on knowledge from the entire world and to contribute to knowledge creation across national and cultural boundaries," said MIT President Susan Hockfield and Provost L. Rafael Reif in a letter announcing the reports to the MIT community. The new strategy underscores the need for both students and faculty to be involved in global research activities, which is a hallmark of the Center's MISTI Program, the largest international program at MIT.

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September 25, 2009

Book talk with Kristof, WuDunn

CIS and Harvard Book Store are delighted to host New York Times correspondents and Pulitzer Prize winners Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn for a discussion of their new book Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide. Kristof and WuDunn set out to expose the struggles of women across Asia and Africa, to tell their human stories, and to follow the progress of women who are ultimately given the opportunity to seize control of their own lives. Introducing the authors will be Diane Davis, professor of political sociology at MIT and head of the International Development Group. Davis also directs the Center's Jerusalem 2050 Program. The event will be Monday, October 5, at 6 PM, at the Brattle Theatre. Tickets are available at Harvard Book Store. Image courtesy Jason Koski, Cornell University.

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