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In the News

December 11, 2012

Use of chemical weapons could be Syria’s ‘bloody crescendo’

Jim WalshWBUR: Cognoscenti

After two years of civil war and more than 40,000 deaths, fears are growing in the West that Syria will unleash chemical weapons in a last-ditch act of desperation.

In the News

November 2, 2012

How civil wars evolve

Fotini ChristiaMIT News

MIT political scientist’s book shows how even the bloodiest conflicts feature pragmatic alliances — not just ancient sectarian divisions.

In the News

October 17, 2012

Where the Arab spring has not yet sprung

Christian CarylForeign Policy

The spirit of rebellion continues to simmer in the Middle East and North Africa. But you won’t see much about it in the headlines.

In the News

October 3, 2012

An idealist on death row

Christian CarylForeign Policy

Why the desperate fate of a little-known Sudanese human rights activists poses some fundamental questions about what it means to be human.

In the News

September 14, 2012

Violence and protests in the Muslim world

Fotini ChristiaMIT News

The world has been roiled by violence in North Africa and the Middle East in recent days. The U.S. ambassador to Libya, J. Christopher Stevens, was killed in an attack this week, while violent protests were launched in many countries following the release of a video insulting the Prophet Muhammad on the Internet. MIT political scientist Fotini Christia, who studies multiethnic conflict in rebuilding nations, talked to MIT News about this complex and fluid situation.

In the News

September 12, 2012

The Salafi moment

Christian CarylForeign PolicyAs the death of a U.S. ambassador in Libya demonstrates, the ultraconservative Salafi movement is pushing to the forefront in the politics of the Middle East. The West should be careful how it reacts.

In the News

June 5, 2012

GOP whining on military spending cuts

Benjamin FriedmanCato Institute

Cato daily podcast featuring Benjamin Friedman.

In the News

May 1, 2012

What might an India-Pakistan war look like?

By Christopher Clary

Toward the end of his presidency, Bill Clinton argued that Kashmir, the territory disputed by India and Pakistan, was 'the most dangerous place in the world.'1 Clinton's second term saw India and Pakistan undergo reciprocal tests of nuclear weapons in 1998, followed in 1999 by the Kargil war, the first conflict between nuclear weapons states since the Ussuri River clashes between the Soviet Union and China in 1969.

In the News

March 30, 2012

The lady's leap of faith

Christian CarylForeign Policy

Why Aung San Suu Kyi's decision to participate in a flawed election could be the biggest gamble of her career.

In the News

November 2, 2011

How cutting Pentagon spending will fix US defense strategy

Benjamin FriedmanForeign Affairs

Austerity is the best possible auditor.

In the News

October 20, 2011

Chappell Lawson on border security

Peter DizikesMIT News

With national security and immigration prominent as political issues, border control is a perennial topic of debate in the United States — especially as the presidential campaign heats up. What are the chief border-security issues now facing the country?

In the News

October 20, 2011

Get ready to starve

Christian CarylForeign Policy

The West was just gearing up to send food to a hungry North Korea. Then came the death of Kim Jong Il.

In the News

October 18, 2011

Two African women won Nobel Peace Prizes, but the continent still has a long way to go to gender equality

Jackee Budesta BatandaBoston Globe

Less than a year ago, women helped lead the reform movements that swept across Libya, Egypt, and Tunisia. But now that those uprisings have succeeded, and the world's attention has shifted elsewhere, women are once again being shoved aside.

In the News

October 18, 2011

North-South Korea talks in US serious, but civil

Harry R. WeberAssociated Press

North and South Korean representatives holding informal talks in the U.S. are sitting together at meals, sharing laughs and even breaking out together in song. But long-standing disputes still cropped up Tuesday on Day 2 of the summit at the University of Georgia.

In the News

October 4, 2011

China's response to a rising India

Erin FriedNBR

Strategic Asia 2011–12: Asia Responds to Its Rising Powers—China and India is the eleventh volume in the Strategic Asia series and explores how key Asian states and regions are responding to the rise of China and India. NBR spoke with M. Taylor Fravel, Strategic Asia contributing author, National Asia Research Associate, and associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who argues that China views India’s rise as a largely positive development that promotes China’s own interests and objectives more than it threatens or challenges them.

In the News

October 3, 2011

Museveni's grip on Uganda

Jackee Budesta BatandaBoston Globe

Don Innocent Wanyama, an editor with the Ugandan newspaper, Daily Monitor, wrote on Facebook, “I had never paid attention to who Vincent Nzaramba was. But our gov’t, as usual, makes me take note. I have just downloaded a copy of his book - which has caused security agents to detain him. Surely, with our poor reading culture why detain someone for writing a book? The regime should worry more about someone who sings. . .’’

In the News

September 26, 2011

A weakened Ahmadinejad

Jim WalshCNN

Some of the stereotypes of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad fall short of the mark, says Jim Walsh.

In the News

September 17, 2011

When death came hand-delivered

Edward Jay EpsteinWall Street Journal

Biological warfare came to America soon after the 9/11 attack. In Florida, a photo editor died of inhalation anthrax. At the time it was thought to be an isolated incident. But then anthrax was found in New York in the newsrooms of NBC and the New York Post, together with letters dated "09-11-2001" and warning: "Death to America Death to Israel Allah Is Great."

In the News

September 15, 2011

Tokyo's transformation

Eric Heginbotham, Ely Ratner, and Richard J. SamuelsForeign Affairs

How Japan is changing -- and what it means for the United States.

In the News

August 19, 2011

Japan after Kan

Chris AchesonNBR

Although Kan’s resignation may assist the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) in rebuilding public trust in its ability to lead, questions remain about the future of the DPJ and the political structure of Japan as it stands today. Japanese domestic politics expert, Richard J. Samuels, provides insight into the DPJ, its political strategy, and the challenges the next administration will face.

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