News + Media

The Chinese aircraft carrier Liaoning, purchased from Ukraine, participates in a 2019 naval parade near Qingdao. (Mark Schiefelbein/Pool/AP)

In the News

March 9, 2022

Ukraine helped build China’s modern military, but when war came, Beijing chose Russia

Eva Dou and Pei Lin Wu The Washington Post

Quoted: “Russia is far and away the most important arms supplier to China,” said M Taylor Fravel, the director of the security studies program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “Where Ukraine has really helped China has been in the area of jet engines, as well as some ship engines and air-to-air missiles.”

A MIG-29 fighter jet of the Polish Air Force in Radom, Poland, in 2013.

Analysis + Opinion

March 9, 2022

Pentagon says Poland’s fighter jet offer is not ‘tenable.’

Ada PetriczkoNew York Times

The Pentagon on Tuesday rejected an offer from the Polish government to send its MiG-29 fighter planes to a United States air base in Germany for eventual use by Ukraine, a rare note of disunity between two NATO allies as they confront Russia.

Refugees fleeing Russia's invasion of Ukraine in Lviv, March 2022 Kai Pfaffenbach / Reuters

Analysis + Opinion

March 8, 2022

How the war in Ukraine could get much worse

Emma Ashford and Joshua ShifrinsonForeign Affairs
Families fleeing Ukraine

Analysis + Opinion

March 8, 2022

For this border crisis, Poles extend a warm welcome, unlike last time.

Ada PetriczkoNew York Times

Years of nationalist, anti-refugee policies have left Poland with a fragmented immigration system. It’s now mostly up to citizens to handle what the UNHCR said was “the fastest growing refugee crisis in Europe since World War II."

Two men on the street outside a building with the exchange rate in neon signs

Analysis + Opinion

March 8, 2022

The Russian sanctions regime and the risk of catastrophic success

Erik Sand and Suzanne FreemanWar on the Rocks

Since the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Western governments have turned to economic sanctions as their principal response.  Erik Sand and Suzanne Freeman explore the potential consequences of sanctions and outcomes/responses by Putin and the West.

Vladimir Medinsky gives a lecture on the 300th anniversary of the Russian Empire.  Text on the screen reads “Russia is a  multiethnic country.”

Analysis + Opinion

March 7, 2022

The ghosts of history haunt the Russia-Ukraine crisis

Elizabeth WoodBroadstreet

If we want to understand whether Putin has any commitment to these talks, we have to understand the view of both men (and many others) that Ukraine is not now nor should ever be an independent state.  And we have to wonder what it means that the man placed in charge of the negotiations from the Russian side has explicitly called the country he is negotiating with a “phantom.”

Mariya Ginberg speaking in a panel discussion, next to Taylor Fravel and Carol Saivetz

News@E40

March 7, 2022

Understanding the war in Ukraine with MIT SSP

“Understanding the War in Ukraine” is a special seminar presented by MIT's Security Studies Program held on March 2, 2022. Participants in the panel discussion and subsequent Q&A were: Mariya Grinberg, a professor of Political Science at MIT; Barry Posen, a professor of Political Science at MIT; Carol Saivetz, a special adviser to MIT SSP; Elizabeth Wood, a Russia specialist and professor of History at MIT; moderated by M Taylor Fravel, director of MIT SSP.

Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Kremlin in Moscow on February 21, 2022. Speculation mounts over what his end game is in Ukraine and whether the conflict could spark a move against his rule.

In the News

March 6, 2022

Nuclear fears intensify as Ukraine war builds. What is Putin's threshold?

Fred GuterlNewsweek

Quoted: “If the Russian campaign starts to feel like it's a military catastrophe, that's where escalation to nuclear weapons comes into play,” says Barry Posen, Ford International Professor of Political Science at MIT....“I don't like the discussions I'm hearing from the fringes of the establishment,” says Posen. “I don't like the emotions running hot. I don't like the weird appearance on our side, way too early, of a kind of victory disease: ‘Let's win this thing. Maybe Putin will fall’.”

Barry Posen archived article image

Analysis + Opinion

March 4, 2022

From 1994: Posen's "A Defense Concept for Ukraine"

Barry PosenUkraine: Issues of Security

In 1994, SSP professor Barry Posen published "A Defense Concept for Ukraine" in the Russian language journal Ukraine: Issues of Security. Today, for the first time, Posen and SSP are publishing that plan in English. Given the ongoing war in Ukraine, and the apparent sturdiness of Ukrainian defense forces, it is a timely piece of analysis from the twilight of the Cold War.

Faculty from teams in the “Building equity and fairness into climate solutions” category share their thoughts on the need for inclusive solutions that prioritize disadvantaged, minority, and indigenous populations.

In the News

March 4, 2022

Q&A: Climate Grand Challenges finalists on building equity and fairness into climate solutions

MIT News Office

A team led by Evan Lieberman, professor of political science and director of the MIT Global Diversity Lab and MIT International Science and Technology Initiatives, Danielle Wood, assistant professor in the Program in Media Arts and Sciences and the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and Siqi Zheng, professor of urban and real estate sustainability in the Center for Real Estate and the Department of Urban Studies and Planning, is seeking to  reduce ethnic and racial group-based disparities in the capacity of urban communities to adapt to the changing climate.

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